ImPACT Baseline Testing

Summerland Minor Hockey Association requires that all players – Pee Wee age (11+) and up – take a Baseline test before their first SMHA ice session of the current season. There is no additional cost to those SMHA members who take the test. Test dates will be made available in the last week of August & first week of September before the first SMHA Ice Time of the season.

Players new to SMHA must take the baseline test upon arrival to SMHA, those who have taken the test (2nd yr Pee Wee and up) are required to take the Baseline test every second year.

Please read the following information below for further information. Please do not hesitate to contact the SMHA Risk Manager, ImPACT Co-ordinator, Registrar, or President with any questions. Executive contact information can be found on SMHA web page.

If your child has sustained a concussion, and requires their baseline information, or would like to arrange a 'post-injury' test, please contact any of those mentioned above. Baseline test results can be sent via email.

SMHA IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR MEDICAL EVALUATION IF AN INJURY IS SUSPECTED, OR MEDICAL CLEARANCE FOR A PLAYER TO RETURN TO PLAY.

PLEASE CONSULT WITH MEDICAL OFFICIALS IF A CONCUSSION IS SUSPECTED ASAP.

SMHA PROVIDES THE ImPACT BASELINE TEST AS A TOOL TO USE ALONGSIDE THE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS OF A CONCUSSION AND IT'S SYMPTOMS

The ImPACT ‘Baseline’ Test

ImPACT's Test is computerized and takes about 25 minutes to complete. ImPACT recommends that it be administered by an ImPACT trained athletic trainer, school nurse, athletic director, team doctor or psychologist.

How old do you have to be to take a baseline test? You have to be 10 years or older to take a baseline test. Unfortunately, the test does not record the results for someone who is under 10.

How often should an athlete obtain a Baseline test?  For high school age athletes and older, a baseline test every other year is acceptable. There is no need to complete a baseline test less than 1 year apart. A POST-INJURY TEST IS NOT A BASELINE TEST.

If a concussion is suspected, the baseline report will serve as a comparison to a repeat ImPACT test (post-injury test), which professionals can use to assess potential changes or damage caused by a concussion. The management of concussions should only be conducted by trained medical professionals.

For more information: http://impacttest.com/about/?The-ImPACT-Test-4 & https://www.impacttest.com/about/?Frequently-Asked-Questions-7

The ImPACT ‘Post-injury’ Test

Depending on a players “return to play” strategy (determined by severity of concussion symptoms and doctor’s advice, see below), a ‘post-injury’ test may be required to help gauge when a player can get back to their ‘normal’ routine.

Of note: A brain injury can be compared to a muscle strain – if you hurt a muscle, exposing it to any level of activity right away is not recommended so to ensure proper recovery. That being said, if a player is experiencing the effects of a ‘severe’ concussion several days following the initial injury (nausea, dizziness, light sensitiveness, headaches, etc. see below for list), a ‘post-injury’ test should not be attempted until a doctor gives approval.

If a post-injury test is recommended*, the athlete will be required to re-take the test.  Both the preseason and post-injury test data is given to a local doctor or, to help evaluate the injury.  The information gathered can also be shared with your family doctor.  The test data will enable these health professionals to determine when return-to-play is appropriate and safe for the injured athlete.  If an injury of this nature occurs to your child, you will be promptly contacted with all the details.

*A player may have to take more than one ‘post-injury’ test before they return to play. This process is based on the advice of the player’s doctor, is done in conjunction with their “return to play” plan, and is done to ensure the player returns to their pre-injury cognitive state before they return to the ice.

Concussion Symptom Information & 6 Step Return to Play Plan:

Post Injury